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Agapostemon Sweat Bee (Agapostemon spp.)


Detailing the identifying qualities of the Agapostemon Sweat Bee, including physical features and territorial reach.


 Updated: 1/30/2018; Authored By Staff Writer; Content ¬©www.InsectIdentification.org







  Agapostemon Sweat Bee  
Picture of Agapostemon-Sweat-Bee


Agapostemon Sweat Bees seem drawn to perspiration, flying around and landing on sweaty arms and legs of unsuspecting people.





There are over a dozen species of Agapostemon Sweat Bees. Males are easier to identity than females because of their distinct coloring. The head and thorax of males are a metallic green, but its abdomen is comprised of the black and yellow bands typically seen in the bee family. Females of many species are mostly green all over. Some species are very social and share nests, while others are more solitary in nature.

Nests are burrows dug into dirt or banks. Pollen grains are collected and placed in each egg's cell to provide food for the expected larva. For this reason, most sightings of adults occur around in or in gardens and meadows laden with blooms. Spring and summer are peak times of year for activity.

Adults drink flower nectar and eat pollen, and are not aggressive. They will sting in self-defense, however, if they are hit or almost crushed. Agapostemon Sweat Bees sometimes get close to, or touch parts of, the body that are perspiring. They seem to enjoy drinking the salty liquid off of our skin. Some are so small and lightweight, they are able to do so without the person even realizing it!








Agapostemon Sweat Bee Information



Category: Bee, Ant, Wasp and Similar
Common Name: Agapostemon Sweat Bee
Scientific Name: Agapostemon spp.
Other Name(s): Striped Sweat Bees


Taxonomy Hierarchy



 Arrow graphic Kingdom: Animalia
  Arrow graphic Phylum: Arthropoda
   Arrow graphic Class: Insecta
    Arrow graphic Order: Hymenoptera
     Arrow graphic Family: Halictidae
      Arrow graphic Genus: Agapostemon
       Arrow graphic Species: spp.

Size, Identifying Tags and Territorial Reach



Size (Adult, Length): Size (Adult, Length): 4 mm to 12 mm (0.156 inches to 0.468 inches)
Identifying Colors: green, yellow, black
Additional Descriptors: metallic, shiny, half, flying, sweat, drink, two, helpful, pollinator

North American Territorial Reach (Though Not Limited To): Alabama; Alaska; Arizona; Arkansas; California; Colorado; Connecticut; Delaware; Florida; Georgia; Hawaii; Idaho; Illinois; Indiana; Iowa; Kansas; Kentucky; Louisiana; Maine; Maryland; Massachusetts; Michigan; Minnesota; Mississippi; Missouri; Montana; Nebraska; Nevada; New Hampshire; New Jersey; New Mexico; New York; North Carolina; North Dakota; Ohio; Oklahoma; Oregon; Pennsylvania; Rhode Island; South Carolina; South Dakota; Tennessee; Texas; Utah; Vermont; Virginia; Washington; West Virginia; Wisconsin; Wyoming; Alberta; British Columbia; Manitoba; New Brunswick; Newfoundland and Labrador; Nova Scotia; Ontario; Prince Edward Island; Quebec; Saskatchewan; Mexico

A Note About Territorial Reach: Keep in mind that an insect's reach is not limited by lines drawn on a map and therefore species may appear in areas, regions and/or states beyond those listed above. Insects are driven by environmental factors, food supplies and mating patterns and do not nescessarily work within hard-and-fast territorial lines like we humans do.

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