Insect Identification logo
Icon of the state of Texas
Icon of a spider
Icon of a beetle insect
Icon of a butterfly
Icon of a bee
Icon of the Bugfinder utility

Bicolored Sallow (Sunira bicolorago)


Detailing the physical features, habits, territorial reach and other identifying qualities of the Bicolored Sallow.

 Updated: 10/2/2019; Authored By Staff Writer; Content ¬©www.InsectIdentification.org




A two-toned wing is not always the easiest way to identify the somewhat varied Bicolored Sallow Moth.



The two colors of the Bicolored Sallow Moth are brown and a darker purple-brown, but it is not seen on every individual. In bicolored specimens, the upper half of the wings is orange-brown while the lower half is darker with purple undertones. There are individuals that have wings showing mostly brown with only streaks of that darker, purple tone. All individuals have a furry, brown thorax and a dark ring on the outer, upper half of each forewing. Beneath the ring is a dark spot at the middle of the wing.

The caterpillar for the Bicolored Sallow Moth is brown with a black head. A single dark band wraps around the first segment of the body, just after the head. The segments near the rear end each have a triangular-shaped, darker brown patch in the center. They feed on the leaves of common trees like oak, willow, elm, cherry, and crabapple as well as crops like cabbage and tobacco.

This is a fairly common moth in the eastern and northern part of the continent. What is uncommon is its usual months of activity. While most moths take immediate advantage of warming weather in spring, this species is not typically seen flying until August or September. All activity ends by November or December making the window to catch a glimpse of this one somewhat narrow.
Flying insect icon




Taxonomic Hierarchy
Kingdom: Animalia
  Phylum: Arthropoda
    Class: Insecta
      Order: Lepidoptera
        Family: Noctuidae
          Genus: Sunira
            Species: bicolorago
Identifying Information
Scientific Name: Sunira bicolorago
Other Name(s): Shield-backed Cutworm (caterpillar)
Category: Butterfly or Moth
Size (Adult; Length): 18mm to 20mm (0.70in to 0.78in)
Colorwheel Graphic Colors: brown, purple, gray, orange
Descriptors: flying, purple
Territorial Map
Alaska  
Hawaii  
Prince Edward Is.  
State of Alabama graphic
State of Arizona graphic
State of Arkansas graphic
State of California graphic
State of Colorado graphic
State of Delware graphic
State of Florida graphic
State of Georgia graphic
State of Idaho graphic
State of Illinois graphic
State of Indiana graphic
State of Iowa graphic
State of Kansas graphic
State of Kentucky graphic
State of Louisiana graphic
State of Maine graphic
State of Maryland graphic
State of Michigan graphic
State of Minnesota graphic
State of Mississippi graphic
State of Missouri graphic
State of Montana graphic
State of Nebraska graphic
State of Nevada graphic
State of New England graphic
State of New Jersey graphic
State of New Mexico graphic
State of New York graphic
State of North Carolina graphic
State of North Dakota graphic
State of Ohio graphic
State of Oklahoma graphic
State of Oregon graphic
State of Pennsylvania graphic
State of South Carolina graphic
State of South Dakota graphic
State of Tennessee graphic
State of Texas graphic
State of Utah graphic
State of Virginia graphic
State of Washington graphic
State of West Virginia graphic
State of Wisconsin graphic
State of Wyoming graphic
Canadian territory of Alberta graphic
Canadian territory of British Columbia graphic
Canadian territory of Manitoba graphic
Canadian territory of New Brunswick graphic
Canadian territory of Newfoundland and Labrador graphic
Canadian territory of Ontario graphic
Canadian territory of Quebec graphic
Canadian territory of Saskatchewan graphic
Territory map graphic of the country of Mexico
Contiguous United States shape map layer graphic




Territorial Reach (A-to-Z)
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Canadian National Flag Graphic
Alberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
New Brunswick
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Ontario
Prince Edward Island
Quebec
Saskatchewan
Mexican National Flag Graphic
Mexico
Note: An insect's reach is not limited by lines drawn on a map and therefore species may appear in areas, regions and/or states beyond those listed above as they are driven by environmental factors (such as climate change), available food supplies and mating patterns. Grayed-out selections indicate that the subject in question has not been reported in that particular territory. U.S. states and Canadian provinces / territories are clickable to their respective bug listings.




Butterfly and Moth Anatomy
Graphic showing basic anatomy of a common North American butterfly and moth insect
1
Antennae: Butterflies and Moths have a pair of antennae on the head used as sensors.
2
Head: The head is home to the insect's eyes, antennae, and proboscis.
3
Thorax: Home to the three pairs of legs as well as vital internal organs.
4
Abdomen: Contains vital internal organs such as the heart(s) and reproduction facilities.
5
Forewing: The upper, forward wing pair used for flying.
6
Hindwing: The lower, rearward wing pair used for flying.
NOTE: Butterflies and Moths are part of the Lepidopteran order as they share many similarities.