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Green June Beetle (Cotinus nitida)


Detailing the physical features, habits, territorial reach and other identifying qualities of the Green June Beetle.

 Updated: 1/15/2019; Authored By Staff Writer; Content ¬©www.InsectIdentification.org




The robust Green June Beetle is a beautiful little menace that feasts on all sorts of valuable produce.



Green June Beetles are a lovely emerald green color with a tan, golden border. Blushes of gold may also form on the elytra (wing coverings). THeir belly is also metallic; part green and part brown. Big black eyes sit on either side of the green head. Short dark brown antennae split at the tips. They can grow large, easily over an inch long, and have a solid heft about them. They are frequent and active flyers, and may be mistaken for a carpenter bee when heard flying thanks to the similar noise they make. Green June Beetles visit gardens, orchards, crops, and open wooded areas. Adults feed on stone fruit crops like peaches and plums in the Southeastern U.S., eating into the fruit before humans can get to it. Raspberries, quince, apples, and nectarines are also victims of feeding. The adult beetles skip around to all types of vegetation in search of food. Adults also drink from open flowers like buttercups and hollyhocks, and blossoms on maple and oak trees. The beetle itself if not harmful to humans; just to the crops we grow. Adults bore into ripe fruit, leaving behind feces inside and on the blemished produce.

Larvae (grubs) hatch underground and feed on the roots of grasses, vegetables, and ornamental plants. In large numbers, this weakens a plant and may cause it to die. They also dig deep tunnels into the soil, leaving little holes with mounds of dirt around the opening. This can be problematic for golf courses because the pristine turf is aesthetically compromised by the grubs. A long rainy spell forces grubs to dig their way to the surface of the soil to avoid drowning, but they will try to go back underground once the soil is dry enough. If unearthed or at the soil's surface, they are often seen crawling on their back with their legs in the air, awkwardly inching their way forward. They overwinter deep in the soil and emerge as adults the next spring. Identifying this particular insect as the source of turf issues is critical before attempting to employ biological and chemical management strategies.
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Taxonomic Hierarchy
Kingdom: Animalia
  Phylum: Arthropoda
    Class: Insecta
      Order: Coleoptera
        Family: Scarabaeidae
          Genus: Cotinus
            Species: nitida
Identifying Information
Scientific Name: Cotinus nitida
Other Name(s): June Bug
Category: Beetle
Size (Adult; Length): 20mm to 30mm (0.78in to 1.17in)
Colorwheel Graphic Colors: green, brown, black
Descriptors: shiny, metallic, buzzing
Territorial Map
Alaska  
Hawaii  
Prince Edward Is.  
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Territorial Reach (A-to-Z)
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
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Alberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
New Brunswick
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Ontario
Prince Edward Island
Quebec
Saskatchewan
Mexican National Flag Graphic
Mexico
Note: An insect's reach is not limited by lines drawn on a map and therefore species may appear in areas, regions and/or states beyond those listed above as they are driven by environmental factors (such as climate change), available food supplies and mating patterns. Grayed-out selections indicate that the subject in question has not been reported in that particular territory. U.S. states and Canadian provinces / territories are clickable to their respective bug listings.




Beetle Anatomy
Graphic showing basic anatomy of a common North American Beetle insect
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Antennae: Beetles have a pair of antennae on the head used as sensors.
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Head: The head is home to the insect's eyes, antennae, and mandibles (jaws).
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Thorax: Holds the three pairs of legs as well as vital internal organs.
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Elytron: One of two wing cases on a Beetle that protects its wings (plural: elytra).
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Wings: Appendages used for flying and kept under the elytra until needed.
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Abdomen: Houses organs related to circulation, reproduction, and excretion.
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Legs: Beetles have three pairs of legs located at the thorax, numbering six legs in all.