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Red Oak Borer (Enaphalodes rufulus)


Detailing the physical features, habits, territorial reach and other identifying qualities of the Red Oak Borer.

 Updated: 6/27/2016; Authored By Staff Writer; Content ¬©www.InsectIdentification.org




The Red Oak Borer Beetle makes a mess of good timber, wreaking havoc on the industry.



The larvae of this beetle bore into weak, but still living, Red Oak and White Oak wood. Oak trees that have been cut down for human use (flooring, cabinets, furniture, etc.) and allowed to dry in lumber yards has become prime real estate for the Red Oak Beetle. Despite its name, this beetle takes advantage of many kinds of oak trees. It is considered a major pest to the timber industry because the larvae compromise the strength and integrity of the wood, rendering it useless and wasted for its original purpose. While still usable for other purposes, the quality is almost cut in half and the price timber companies can ask for the wood depreciates at a loss for the business. Removing infested trees from the pile can and has greatly helped reduce the damage to standing logs. Signs of infection/infestation are easy to recognize with practice (bark discoloration, shavings of frass kicked out of the tunnels by the larvae, weeping sap, etc.).

Like all Longhorn Beetles, the Red Oak Borer Beetle has antennae that are much longer than the beetle's actual body. (The orange coloring on the face in some of the photos is believed to be a mass of mites or other small insect and does not have any relation to the name of the Red Oak Borer.) They are brown and tan and covered with fine hairs.




Taxonomic Hierarchy
Kingdom: Animalia
  Phylum: Arthropoda
    Class: Insecta
      Order: Coleoptera
        Family: Cerambycidae
          Genus: Enaphalodes
            Species: rufulus
Identifying Information
Scientific Name: Enaphalodes rufulus
Category: Beetle
Size (Adult; Length): 9mm to 27mm (0.35in to 1.05in)
Colorwheel Graphic Colors: red; brown; orange; tan; ivory
Descriptors: hairy, flying
Territorial Map
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Territorial Reach (A-to-Z)
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
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Alberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
New Brunswick
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Ontario
Prince Edward Island
Quebec
Saskatchewan
Mexican National Flag Graphic
Mexico
Note: An insect's reach is not limited by lines drawn on a map and therefore species may appear in areas, regions and/or states beyond those listed above as they are driven by environmental factors (such as climate change), available food supplies and mating patterns. Grayed-out selections indicate that the subject in question has not been reported in that particular territory. U.S. states and Canadian provinces / territories are clickable to their respective bug listings.




Beetle Anatomy
Graphic showing basic anatomy of a common North American Beetle insect
1
Antennae: Beetles have a pair of antennae on the head used as sensors.
2
Head: The head is home to the insect's eyes, antennae, and mandibles (jaws).
3
Thorax: Holds the three pairs of legs as well as vital internal organs.
4
Elytron: One of two wing cases on a Beetle that protects its wings (plural: elytra).
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Wings: Appendages used for flying and kept under the elytra until needed.
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Abdomen: Houses organs related to circulation, reproduction, and excretion.
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Legs: Beetles have three pairs of legs located at the thorax, numbering six legs in all.