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Wolf Spider: T. georgicola (Tigrosa georgicola)


Detailing the physical features, habits, territorial reach and other identifying qualities of the Wolf Spider: T. georgicola.

 Updated: 4/25/2019; Authored By Staff Writer; Content ¬©www.InsectIdentification.org




This species of Wolf Spider is common throughout the South and is often found wandering in and around gardens, outbuildings, and the yard.



Wolf Spider: T. georgicola Videos



A Wolf Spider trying to hide in a plant tray


Returning a Wolf Spider back into the wild without touching it

Tigrosa georgicola is a species of Wolf Spider. This family includes the largest native spiders found in North America. This species hunts prey instead of spinning a web for ensnarement. It moves quickly, but with stealth, often concealing itself in dark corners or under the cover of leaf litter and logs. The spider is dark brown with a single light tan stripe running down the middle of its carapace. Small and faint pale marks may be visible on the large abdomen. Legs are mottled with bands near the joints. Wolf Spiders have impressive eyes that can reflect light in the dark, like deer and dogs. This characteristic is best seen at night, so it might not happen often with Tigrosa georgicola.

This spider is an active daytime hunter, so the likelihood of coming across one in the woods on a hike or in the yard is better than with other, nocturnal Wolf Spiders. Like almost every spider, it can and will bite if cornered and threatened. Its venom is not poisonous, but the bite of a Wolf Spider is painful. It can take days to heal. When sighted, it may remain still or run in quick bursts to increase the distance from a threat. Handling a Wolf Spider is not recommended.

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Taxonomic Hierarchy
Kingdom: Animalia
  Phylum: Arthropoda
    Class: Arachnida
      Order: Araneae
        Family: Lycosidae
          Genus: Tigrosa
            Species: georgicola
Identifying Information
Scientific Name: Tigrosa georgicola
Category: Spider
Size (Adult; Length): 10mm to 22mm (0.39in to 0.86in)
Colorwheel Graphic Colors: brown, tan
Descriptors: dark, large, huge, fast, biting, venomous, southeastern, line stripe
Territorial Map
Alaska  
Hawaii  
Prince Edward Is.  
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Territorial Reach (A-to-Z)
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
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Alberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
New Brunswick
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Ontario
Prince Edward Island
Quebec
Saskatchewan
Mexican National Flag Graphic
Mexico
Note: An insect's reach is not limited by lines drawn on a map and therefore species may appear in areas, regions and/or states beyond those listed above as they are driven by environmental factors (such as climate change), available food supplies and mating patterns. Grayed-out selections indicate that the subject in question has not been reported in that particular territory. U.S. states and Canadian provinces / territories are clickable to their respective bug listings.


Spider Anatomy
Graphic showing basic parts of spider anatomy
1
Legs: Spiders have four pairs of legs and these are attached to the cephalothorax.
2
Pedipalps: Small appendages near the mouth used as taste and smell organs.
3
Cephalothorax: Contains eyes, head, mouthparts, and legs.
4
Abdomen: Contains various organs related to digestion, reproduction, and web-making.
5
Spinnerets: Used in the production of spider silk for fashioning webs or catching prey.
NOTE: Unlike insects, spiders have both an endoskeleton (internal) and exoskeleton (external).